San Carlo al Lazzaretto, Milan

4.4
San Carlo al Lazzaretto is located in Milan. A visit to San Carlo al Lazzaretto represents just the start of the adventure when you use our Milan trip maker app to plot your vacation.
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San Carlo al Lazzaretto Reviews

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36 reviews
Google
4.7
TripAdvisor
  • Very nice church built in 1488 on design of Pellegrino Tibaldi. Is octagonal planimetry was in the center of the Lazaret realized at the end of 15th century Found closed  more »
  • Looks like San Carlo at Alazzetta was recently remolded. It was closed . I was told it has limited visiting hours. I just saw the outside.  more »
Google
  • At the time of the construction of the Lazzaretto in Milan, built by Lazarus Palazzi at the end of the 15th century, a modest altar was built in the middle of the enclosure itself so that the officiated functions could be easily seen and heard by the patients present anywhere in the lazzaretto. Following the great plague epidemic of 1576, Archbishop Carlo Borromeo commissioned his trusted architect, Pellegrino Tibaldi, to build a new building of worship on the site of the previous one. This is how the present building was built, a central, octagonal newsstand, open on all sides. The building continued to perform its function throughout the 17th century, until, in 1797, following the conquest French the Duchy of Milan, the lazzaretto was intended for military purposes. At the time when Milan was the capital of the Cisalpina Republic, the architect Giuseppe Piermarini was commissioned to transform the church into a Temple of the Fatherland. Piermarini demolished the original dome of the building, while the exterior walls were already walled. During the 19th century the Lazzaretto fence was used for agricultural and private farm dwellings, until the purchase by the Italian Credit Bank that decided the demolition and lottization of the area. The temple was spared from demolition, and following the restoration on which the dome was rebuilt, it was reopened to worship in 1884 with the current dedication to the Saint who wanted to build it. Due to the vibrations produced by the railway passer-by under Tunisia avenue that caused damage to the dome the church has been the subject of engineering studies to strengthen its structure. After a failed attempt to raise funds for restoration among the public the church was the subject of a complete restoration funded by the Rocca Foundation in memory of Roberto Rocca. The aim was to use the church both as a place of worship and as a concert hall. To this end the premises added in the late 1800s to accommodate the sacrisity and the parish priest's accommodation on the north side have been transformed into changing rooms, bathrooms, rehearsal room and accommodation for concertgoers. The side altars have been removed and the central altar has been moved towards the wall to have more space for concerts. Work started in the interior in September 2015 was completed in June 2017. The architectural project was drawn up by Studio 02 Arch, the static consolidation was followed by the Associate Studio Brambilla Ferrari, the restoration was carried out by Naos Restauri. A new organ with 1800 reeds has been installed, designed by Martino Lurani Cernuschi with romantic-symphonic setting. The church was inaugurated by the Archbishop of Milan Mario Delpini on November 3, 2017 at 20.30 with a mass. The church is open daily from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m., two masses are held on Wednesdays and Fridays at 10 a.m. The municipality completed in 2016 the project of pedestrianization of Largo Bellintani around the church, which eliminates the passage of cars from Via Lecco to Avenue Tunisia, leaving it instead along via Palazzi. The project is arch. Loredana Brambilla of the City of Milan. The building develops around a central octagonal plant. Each side consists of a serliana, now walled, supported by columns made of stone of Ionic order. Inside there is an additional smaller round of columns and pillars that support the dome and lantern, which repeat in the form the external structure.
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  • To visit. Perfectly restored by the Rocca Foundation, it houses some wonderful paintings well illuminated by natural light. Interesting the now well-preserved octagonal structure. Visitable daily from 9 a.m. to 12 p.m.
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